Resources by state on violence against women

American Bar Association Commission on Domestic Violence The mission of the ABA Commission on Domestic Violence is to increase access to justice for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking by mobilizing the legal profession. The Commission addresses the acute need to increase the number of well-trained and supported attorneys providing representation to victims by providing creative training opportunities for lawyers, law students and other legal advocates. It serves a national network of community-based-organizations; advocates and professionals in legal, health, mental health, and social services; government agencies; state coalitions; national domestic and sexual violence organizations; and activists from communities and social justice organizations working to eliminate violence against women. Its goals are to strengthen advocacy, promote community organizing, and influence systems change. It identifies and addresses critical issues, provides technical assistance and training, conducts research, and engages in policy advocacy. Our clients include a range of Asian ethnic populations.

Westport, CT

We apologize — Our live chat is currently experiencing technical difficulties. According to their website, it is a national effort by activists, community leaders and national and local organizations, to raise awareness about dating abuse, promote programs that support young people, and encourage communities to prevent this form of abuse with the goal of decreasing the prevalence of dating abuse among young people. This campaign occurs every February. Break the Cycle was started in in Los Angeles, California to fill the gap in services for young people experiencing abuse in dating relationships.

BTC helps youth by encouraging them to speak about dating abuse in their schools and communities. They offer training and workshops to equip communities to support youth in healthy relationships.

If you are a victim of abuse, you are not alone. Here you’ll find resources from around the Commonwealth to help you.

Parents that believe teen dating violence is not an issue or admit they don’t know if it’s an issue. Are You Experiencing Abuse? We provide direct services to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault; to educate the community regarding violence against women, children, and men; to prevent the cycle of violence.

Love is Respect. Teen dating violence is a major public health issue that occurs across diverse groups and cultures. It is a pattern of abuse or threat of abuse among adolescent partners. It includes verbal, emotional, physical, sexual, and digital internet abuse and may have both immediate and long term effects. The Teen Dating Violence Prevention and Bystander Intervention groups foster an environment that empowers youth to change the way they see themselves, how they interact with others and make positive changes in their community.

These groups have an educational component built into them to challenge the ideals that support physical, sexual and emotional violence in relationships.

Teen Dating Violence

It occurs between two people in a close relationship and includes:. TDV can happen in person or electronically including repeated texting or posting sexual pictures of a partner online without their permission. Unhealthy or violent relationships can have severe short and long-term effects on a developing teen. For example, youth who are victims of TDV are more likely to:. Supporting the development of healthy, respectful, and nonviolent relationships can help reduce the occurrence of TDV and prevent its harmful effects.

During the pre-teen and teen years, it is important for youth to begin learning the skills needed to create and maintain healthy relationships.

Reach out directly to get help for domestic violence by using one of these resources, or call the statewide domestic violence helpline: HELP.

If you think you may be in an abusive relationship and need assistance, or if you are looking for help for a friend, please call the Philadelphia Domestic Violence Hotline at Expert counselors are waiting to speak with you, and all calls are confidential. For your safety, we will not respond to e-mail requests for assistance with problems of domestic violence.

Get more information on seeking help. To learn about and apply for employment and volunteer positions, please visit our Opportunities page. To request a workshop or training on domestic violence, please complete our Training Request Form.

Queens News

Domestic abuse , also called “domestic violence” or “intimate partner violence”, can be defined as a pattern of behavior in any relationship that is used to gain or maintain power and control over an intimate partner. Abuse is physical, sexual, emotional, economic or psychological actions or threats of actions that influence another person. This includes any behaviors that frighten, intimidate, terrorize, manipulate, hurt, humiliate, blame, injure, or wound someone.

Domestic abuse can happen to anyone of any race, age, sexual orientation, religion, or gender. It can occur within a range of relationships including couples who are married, living together or dating. Domestic violence affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels.

The distinctive dynamics of dating abuse along with harmful social norms (such as the notion that what happens in a relationship is no one else’s business) make it.

While it may not be a comfortable topic, domestic violence DV is a lot more common than you might think, both in the United States and around the world. You might be tempted to shrug them off as just the normal throes of a relationship. If you, your children, or your loved ones are in immediate danger, leave right now. When you are in a safe place, call If you have some time to plan, the Domestic Violence Resource Center offers pointers for establishing a safety plan and how to carry it out safely.

Department of Human Health and Services offers more details on how to leave safely. The hotline provides hour support and crisis intervention to victims and survivors of DV through safety planning, advocacy, resources, and a supportive ear. This project of the National Domestic Violence Hotline exists to support youth and young adults in ending dating violence. The website includes planning resources, legal help, educator toolkits, and more.

Founded by lesbian survivors of domestic violence, the Northwest Network works to end abuse in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities. It strives to support and empower all survivors through education and advocacy. The organization also runs programs to prevent violence, assist survivors, and ensure that rapists are brought to justice.

Here are some more standout organizations working to stop domestic violence by educating communities, legal systems, political circles, and beyond.

Domestic Violence National/Global Resources

Three national organizations can also provide information and help connect callers to their local domestic violence or sexual assault agency:. The National Sexual Assault Online Hotline – Help and support for victims of sexual assault who may be unable or unsafe using a national telephone hotline. While the Michigan Domestic Violence Prevention and Treatment Board MDVPTB does not provide direct support to individuals or their friends and family who are impacted by domestic, dating and sexual violence, we believe it is important to connect those seeking help to local agencies that do provide these critical services.

National Domestic Violence Hotline can help victims, survivors of domestic violence. Call Chat w/ an advocate on our website.

Skip to main content. A project of Break the Cycle, loveisrespect. Reporting Requirements for Sexually Active Adolescents outlines the ages and circumstances under which Wisconsin minors that are sexually active must be reported under Chapter 48 of the Wisconsin statutes. Wisconsin Attorney General opinions and statutory references are included. End Domestic Abuse Wisconsin is a statewide membership organization of battered women, formerly battered women, domestic abuse programs, and individuals committed to ending domestic violence.

WCADV strives to eliminate domestic violence by changing societal attitudes, practices, and policies about women from diverse groups, their children, and violence through education, advocacy, and social action. WCADV offers publications, technical assistance, policy development, training, and networking and support. The Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault promotes the social change necessary to end sexual violence in Wisconsin and to support a statewide network of concerned individuals and organizations as they work toward this goal.

Resources include training and publications, including information sheets, brochures, booklets, curricula and manuals, and posters. Start Strong focuses on preventing teen dating violence and abuse by teaching middle school-age youth about healthy relationships. For questions about this information, contact Julie Incitti

Other Organizations

The 1Thing campaign is designed to meet teens where they are by encouraging young people to learn one thing about teen dating violence and healthy relationships and share that knowledge with a friend. Teen dating violence includes physical, emotional, sexual, or digital abuse in a current dating relationship or by a former dating partner. Young people experience violence at alarming rates.

RESOURCES FOR VICTIMS AND SURVIVORS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE. NATIONAL CRISIS ORGANIZATIONS AND ASSISTANCE: The National Domestic.

But we are making progress. Awareness building has been an important tool for helping communities to recognize dating abuse and its harms. Our progress is in part due to these ongoing awareness efforts over many years. Schools have a unique role to play in addressing warning signs among students before behaviors escalate, protecting the safety of targeted students, and helping to ensure a positive school climate and safe learning environment for everyone. One-time classroom presentations and even multi-session classroom education are beneficial but certainly not sufficient for adequately supporting young people in developing the attitudes and skills to have safe and healthy, violence-free relationships.

Many of our members and allies have been providing prevention education in schools and other community settings for years. Prevention education teaches about the roots of violence, including restrictive gender norms, characteristics of healthy relationships, and skills to manage emotions, respect boundaries, etc. And this education is very valuable. We collectively need to push beyond the notion that education through verbal persuasion is sufficient for changing behavior, as if the right set of words alone can change attitudes, beliefs and behaviors that are deeply entrenched in long-held social norms.

Young people need supportive environments in addition to messages. Environments set the stage for our attitudes and behaviors. We are all influenced by our environments — youth and adults alike. The school environment is shaped by influencers of that environment, including teachers, coaches, counselors, administrators, healthcare providers, as well as, of course, peers, parents and other caring adults. Within the school environment, influencers can make the desired behavior desirable, reinforce and reward the desired behavior, redirect the undesired behavior early on, harness peer pressure through popular opinion leaders, and so on.

Teen Dating Violence